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Router Fairbanks AK

The plunge router deserves a place in every shop. Routing chores, such as mortising, stopped dados and inlay pattern work, are safer and easier to perform using a plunge router. Its unique base allows the motor housing to ride up and down on a pair of posts fixed to the base. There’s nothing like the plunge router woodworking power tool. There is so much you can do with a plunge router. Here you will learn why it’s so important to have one. Check out the routers at the hardware supply stores in Fairbanks, AK listed below.

The Home Depot
(907)451-9003
601 Johansen Expressway
Fairbanks, AK
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Lowe's
(907) 451-4700
425 Merhar Avenue
Fairbanks, AK
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Samson True Value Hardware
(907) 452-3110
1990 Phillips Field Rd
Fairbanks, AK
 
Fairbanks - B
(907) 474-4400
3115 Airport Way
Fairbanks, AK
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:11-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:11-18

The Home Depot
(907) 276-2006
400 Rodeo Pl
Anchorage, AK
 
Fastenal- Fairbanks
907-455-8600
3580 Cartwright Ct Unit A Fairbanks, AK, 99701
Fairbanks, AK
 
Spenard Builders Supply- Fairbanks
907-450-2200
2460 Phillips Field Road Fairbanks, AK, 99701
Fairbanks, AK
 
Denali Industrial Supply Inc
907-452-4524
2800 Cushman St Fairbanks, AK, 99701
Fairbanks, AK
 
The Home Depot
(907)283-2228
10480 Spur Highway
Kenai, AK
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(907)644-5646
1715 Abbott Road
Anchorage, AK
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Router

8 Great Reasons to Own a Plunge Router

Plunge routers go where no other router can.

by Seth Keller

The plunge router deserves a place in every shop. Routing chores, such as mortising, stopped dados and inlay pattern work, are safer and easier to perform using a plunge router. Its unique base allows the motor housing to ride up and down on a pair of posts fixed to the base. The plunge mechanism is spring-loaded so the motor housing always wants to spring up to the top of the posts. A lock/release lever allows free up-and-down movement of the router housing or locks it in place at a given depth. The depth of cut can be preset, allowing you to position the router over the work and plunge the bit to an exact depth. The depth stop works much like the stop does on a drill press. 

Plunge routers have been around for years. Some die-hard users of fixed-base models may argue that a fixed-base router can do everything that a plunge router can do, but they don’t realize what a great, unique tool the plunge router is. Here are eight things a plunge router can do with ease that present a challenge for a fixed-base model.

Great Template Router

Template routing with guide bushings is trouble-free when you use a plunge router. Just set the router over the template, turn it on, plunge the bit to the preset depth and rout. The plastic bowtie inlay template, shown above, would probably have a few battle scars if a fixed base router had been used. You may get away with tipping it into the cut for a while, but sooner or later that template would be nicked.

Required by Some Jig

A plunge router is a must when it comes to sophisticated jigs, such as the WoodRat  and the FMT by Leigh (see photo, above). These jigs cut mortises, tenons, dovetails and a whole lot more, but they simply can’t perform all their operations without the use of a plunge router.

Ideal for Inlay Grooves

The plunge router is ideally suited for stringing and delicate inlay work, often called captured inlay, because the plunge mechanism allows a smooth entrance and exit from the cut. Try tipping your fixed-base model into a cut like this and your cut will likely be misaligned right where the groove starts. This is one operation you definitely want to get right the first time, and a plunge router is the surest way to get the job done well.

Burn-Free Stopped Flutes

There’s no better way to mill stopped grooves and flutes than by using a plunge router. This type of milling is safer and simpler than using a fixed-base router. All you need to cut perfect flutes is a start block, a stop block and an edge guide. With the router set on the start block, plunge the bit to the preset depth and press the lock lever as you make the cut along the length of the board. At the end of the cut, release the plunge lock lever and the bit retracts off the workpiece, leaving you with the cleanest flutes possible. You won’t leave burn marks, as you...

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