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A Nine-Pot Stand Beatrice NE

Before you set aside your push sticks and dust mask for the season, make something to enjoy all summer. This project takes only about a day to build, once you've got all the materials. It's designed for outdoor use—made from rot-resistant woods and assembled with weatherproof glue and rust-resistant fasteners. Protected with a finish or not, it will enhance your garden or deck for years to come.

Mead Lumber
(402) 223-5264
700 Dorsey St
Beatrice, NE
 
Fastenal- Beatrice
402-228-1600
3414 N 6th Street Beatrice, NE, 68310
Beatrice, NE
 
Beatrice - Auth Hometown
(402) 223-3827
1200 N 6Th St Ste C
Beatrice, NE
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9-18.5
Tue:9-18.5
Wed:9-18.5
Thu:9-18.5
Fri:9-18.5
Sat:9-18
Sun:11-16
Store Features
Mon:9-18.5
Tue:9-18.5
Wed:9-18.5
Thu:9-18.5
Fri:9-18.5
Sat:9-18
Sun:11-16

The Home Depot
(402)328-9669
6800 South 70th Street
Lincoln, NE
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(308)389-3515
911 Allen Drive
Grand Island, NE
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Watkins Ace Hardware
(402) 223-2400
2317 N 6th St
Beatrice, NE
 
Sack Do it Best Lumber
(402) 223-3545
2820 East Court
Beatrice, NE
 
Sack Lumber Company
(402) 821-2812
316 S Wilson Street
Wilber, NE
 
The Home Depot
(402)964-9700
3950 North 144th St
Omaha, NE
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(402)325-6200
3300 N 27th Street
Lincoln, NE
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

A Nine-Pot Stand

A Nine-Pot Stand

Before you set aside your push sticks and dust mask for the season, make  something to enjoy all summer. This project takes only about a day to build, once you've got all the materials. It's designed for outdoor use—made from rot-resistant woods and assembled with weatherproof glue and rust-resistant fasteners. Protected with a finish or not, it will enhance your garden or deck for years to come. 
 
This sturdy little stand is perfect for your deck or patio. It's got room for your favorite plants and it doesn't take up a lot of space. When the weather gets cold, you can easily bring it, and a bit of summertime, indoors.

There's no complicated joinery, just glue and screws. The legs simply chase each other around the base, like a pinwheel. The arms follow suit,  but they're offset, so your plants have plenty of room to grow.

Once you make templates for the legs and arms and the jig for routing the discs, you'll have the stand together in no time. For tools, need a tablesaw, jigsaw, router and a drill, plus clamps and a file or rasp. If you use construction-grade lumber, you won't need a planer or jointer. Rip the 1-1/2-in.-square column from a straight, clear 2x4 and use 1x stock for everything else. We went whole-hog, making ours out of mahogany. We spent about $100 for rough stock and milled it ourselves.

How To Build It
1) Mill all the parts to thickness. Cut the column (A), legs (B) and arms (E) to their finished dimensions. 

2) Make templates for the leg and arm profiles ( Fig. C ).

3) Rough out the legs and arms with a jigsaw or bandsaw, about 1/8-in. oversize. Smooth the profiles with a rasp and sandpaper, a sanding drum mounted in your drill press, or an oscillating spindle sander.

4) Position each leg on the column and drill pilot holes for the screws ( Photo 1 ). Be sure to mark the legs so they'll go back on the same column face during final assembly.

5) Round over the edges of the legs, except for portions that support the discs or go against the column (Fig. A). On the column, stop the round-overs 1-in. away from the joints.

6) Fasten the legs to the column with weatherproof glue and stainless steel screws.

7) Attach the column support block (C).

8) Glue the triangular-shaped arm blocks (D), cut from your leftover column stock, to the column ( Photo 2 ). If a stuck-on block keeps sliding down the column, pull it off, remove the excess glue and stick it back on. Before gluing on the second pair, plane the first pair flush.

9) Attach the arms, following the same procedure you used for fastening the legs (Steps 4 through 6). Make sure the arms wrap around the column in the same direction as the legs, otherwise the discs won't be properly staggered.

10) Make a jig to rout the discs (Part F, Fig. A and Photo 3), cut them to rough size and rout them Fig. B. Then round over th...

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