American Woodworker
Contact Us | Help | Report a Bug
Sign in | Join
 

Arts and Crafts Table Lamp Bennington VT

Our table lamp is reminiscent of the Prairie style of design, with lines that Frank Lloyd Wright might favor. In spite of its complex-looking shade, this elegant lamp is within reach of any intermediate woodworker.

The Home Depot
(802)447-9997
121 N Bennington Rd
Bennington, VT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-7:00pm

H. Greenberg and Son
802-442-3131
321 Main St. Bennington, VT, 05201
Bennington, VT
 
Carr Hardware True Value
(413) 663-6600
192 State Street
North Adams, MA
 
W W Building Supply
(802) 464-3022
Route 100
Wilmington, VT
 
Miles True Value Lbr.
(802) 375-2525
178 Chittenden Dr
Arlington, VT
 
H. Greenberg & Son Inc.
(802) 442-3131
321 Main Street
Bennington, VT
 
Hoosick True Value Hardware
(518) 686-7238
21953 Ny 22
Hoosick Falls, NY
 
H. Greenberg & Son Inc
(413) 664-4576
1366 Curran Highway
North Adams, MA
 
Deerfield Valley Supply
(802) 464-3364
211 Route 9 W
Wilmington, VT
 
Stanleys Lumber & Building Supplies
(413) 743-0831
20 N Summer St
Adams, MA
 

Arts and Crafts Table Lamp

Arts and Crafts Table Lamp

Sure-fire steps simplify the intricate shade joinery.

by Jon Stumbras

Our table lamp is reminiscent of the Prairie style of design, with lines that Frank Lloyd Wright might favor. In spite of its complex-looking shade, this elegant lamp is within reach of any intermediate woodworker. We’ve figured out a straightforward system that tames all those nasty angles and guarantees good results. The wiring is also simple, even if you haven’t done much electrical work. All the parts are readily available through the mail or at a lighting store. You may find that the hardest part is selecting the stained glass. There is a bewildering array of colors and textures to choose from, but that’s part of the fun.

Build the Shade Frame

The shade is made of four identical frames. Use a stop block for all the cuts. 

1. Mill the 4/4 mahogany to thickness and rip the boards into 1-in. widths. Rough-cut three 12-in. pieces and one 18-in. piece for each of the four frames (K, L, M). Cut enough parts to build an extra frame as a precaution and for setup purposes.

2. Attach a long auxiliary fence to your tablesaw’s miter gauge. We added an acrylic guard just as a reminder of where not to put one’s fingers. 

3. Make a setup block for setting your miter gauge angles by cutting a 38-degree angle on one end and a 26-degree angle on the other one. Use an accurate miter saw to cut the block. 

4. Set the miter gauge to cut at 38 degrees (Photo 1). Miter both ends of the frame sides (K) and frame bottoms (M) to final dimensions. Miter just the left edge of the frame top (L). All these cuts can be made using one miter fence setting. 

5. Cut the half-lap joint on the mitered end of each piece (Photo 2; Fig. B, below). Use scrap wood to set the blade height and a stop block for each cut. You will need to rotate the miter gauge 38 degrees right and left of center to accomplish all the angles. 

6. Dry-fit all the pieces together and mark the position of the half-lap on the right side of the frame top (Photo 3). Then cut the rest of the top half-laps.

7. Glue each frame assembly together with small C-clamps. When the glue has set, cut off the waste on the top.

Rabbet for the Glass

8. Make a template out of 1/4-in. plywood to cut rabbets in each frame. Simply place a shade frame on the plywood, trace the interior and mark lines 1/4 in. to the outside of the tracing lines. Cut to this line with a jigsaw. Keep the template 3 in. wide to support the router. 

9. Rout the rabbet with a 1/4-in. straight bit and guide bushing (Photo 4; Fig. C, below). Take several passes of to get the rabbet to full depth. Clean up the corners of the rabbet using a chisel.

Cut the Compound Miters

10. Use the setup block to set the tablesaw miter fence to cut at 38 degrees and angle the blade to 26 degrees. 

11. Place a frame, face side up, with the bottom against the fence. Cut the co...

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker