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Classic Country Hutch Moundsville WV

Carefully select 48 bd. ft. of 4/4 cherry for the two cabinets and 38 bd. ft. of 5/4 stock for the doors, base cabinet top and the crown molding. In addition, you’ll need 16 bd. ft. of 4/4 hard maple for the drawer sides and support system and 75 bd. ft. of 4/4 pine for the shelves and back boards. I spent about $1,000 on lumber.

Ked's Ace Hardware
(304) 845-1400
134 Lafayette Ave
Moundsville, WV
 
Ace Hardware
(304) 230-0000
1239 Warwood Ave
Wheeling, WV
 
Lowe's
(304) 238-2000
2801 Chapline Street
Wheeling, WV
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Nau Do it Best Hardware
(304) 242-7444
1066 E Bethlehem Blvd
Wheeling, WV
 
LOWE'S OF ST. CLAIRSVILLE, OH.
740 699-3000
50421 VALLEY PLAZA DR SAINT CLAIRSVILLE, OH, 43950
Saint Clairsville, OH
 
Mcnear True Value Hardware
(740) 676-9579
4113 Central Ave
Shadyside, OH
 
Lou W Nau, Inc
(304) 242-6311
69 Edgington Lane
Wheeling, WV
 
Al Lorenzi Building Products
(740) 635-9000
54382 National Road
Bridgeport, OH
 
Ferry Hardware
(740) 633-3053
6 S Zane Highway
Martins Ferry, OH
 
Hudson Hardware
(740) 926-1361
43083 Ohio Ave
Beallsville, OH
 

Classic Country Hutch

Classic Country Hutch

American style and classic hardwood create a timeless treasure.

by Tim Johnson

Tall and stately, this cupboard promises to be the focal point of any dining area. A functional wonder, it combines elegant display with spacious storage. For you as a builder, though, this cupboard is loaded with something quite different: advanced techniques that will challenge your woodworking skill. It has all the stuff to be your next dream project.

You’ll be working wood on a grand scale. This cupboard is more than 7 ft. tall and nearly 5 ft. wide. You’ll glue up boards to make all the wide cabinet pieces. You’ll build the dovetailed drawers, raised-panel doors and divided-light doors. To top it off, you’ll make your own crown molding.

Building this cupboard includes so many woodworking techniques that I’m going to refer you to other American Woodworker articles for complete how-to information on a couple of them. How to build divided-light doors is covered in this issue (see “ Divided-Light Doors ”). And instructions for making the lipped drawers with a dovetail jig is covered fully in AW #84, December 2000, page 91.

You’ll need a fully equipped shop to complete this project, along with dedication and determination. But if you accept the challenge, I guarantee you’ll have the woodworking time of your life! 

Carefully select 48 bd. ft. of 4/4 cherry for the two cabinets and 38 bd. ft. of 5/4 stock for the doors, base cabinet top and the crown molding. In addition, you’ll need 16 bd. ft. of 4/4 hard maple for the drawer sides and support system and 75 bd. ft. of 4/4 pine for the shelves and back boards. I spent about $1,000 on lumber.

Build the Base Cabinet

Tall and stately, this cupboard promises to be the focal point of any dining area. A functional wonder, it combines elegant display with spacious storage. For you as a builder, though, this cupboard is loaded with something quite different: advanced techniques that will challenge your woodworking skill. It has all the stuff to be your next dream project.

You’ll be working wood on a grand scale. This cupboard is more than 7 ft. tall and nearly 5 ft. wide. You’ll glue up boards to make all the wide cabinet pieces. You’ll build the dovetailed drawers, raised-panel doors and divided-light doors. To top it off, you’ll make your own crown molding.

Building this cupboard includes so many woodworking techniques that I’m going to refer you to other American Woodworker articles for complete how-to information on a couple of them. How to build divided-light doors is covered in this issue (see “ Divided-Light Doors ”). And instructions for making the lipped drawers with a dovetail jig is covered fully in AW #84, December 2000 , page 91.

You’ll need a fully equipped shop to complete this project, along with dedication and determination.

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker