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Dovetailed Step Stool Hobbs NM

Flat wood is essential for successful dovetailing. Boards that are cupped across the grain will be nothing but trouble. Mill rough lumber to 7⁄8 in., taking an even amount off both sides. Sticker the boards so air circulates all around. After a few days, see if the boards are still flat.

The Home Depot
(575)492-9117
900 W Joe Harvey Blvd
Hobbs, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Fastenal- Hobbs
505-393-8831
321 West Broadway Hobbs, NM, 88240
Hobbs, NM
 
Kmart 7016 / Cross Merch
(575) 397-3587
2220 N Grimes St
Hobbs, NM
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

The Home Depot
(575)443-8018
3400 N White Sand Blvd
Alamogordo, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)344-1900
1220 Renaissance Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Hobbs - Auth Hometown
(575) 492-0445
405 E Navajo Dr
Hobbs, NM
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18.5
Sun:12-17
Store Features
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18.5
Sun:12-17

Lowe's
(575) 492-3230
1510 West Joe Harvey Boulevard
Hobbs, NM
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

The Home Depot
(505)865-0425
1800 Main Street NW
Los Lunas, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)833-9990
2820 Coors Blvd NW
Albuquerque, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)424-9463
952 Richards Ave
Santa Fe, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Dovetailed Step Stool

Dovetailed Step Stool

After I finish a large commission, I like to surprise my client during the holidays with a gift—this sturdy kitchen stepping stool. Making one is a pleasure because it's held together by nothing but dovetails, and I love hand cutting dovetails. A kitchen stool that will face hard use has to be strong. When you stand on the stool and hold onto its tall back for balance, you put extra strain on the joints. That's why this stool is dovetailed throughout, because dovetails make the strongest connection between wide boards. If they fit tight the mechanical interlocking alone is enough to hold boards at a rigid right angle. Adding glue is icing on the cake.

You'll need about six board feet of lumber (about $25), to make this stool. The one in these photos is made of cherry, but any wood will do, including pine. You'll also need some tempered hardboard, 1⁄4 in. and 1⁄2 in. plywood for the jigs and a router and router table. After you've made the jigs and tried them out, set aside one weekend to make the stool.You'll find three different kinds of dovetail joints in this stool: a tapered sliding dovetail that goes across the grain, through dovetails and straight-sliding dovetails that go with the grain.

Prepare the Wood
Flat wood is essential for successful dovetailing. Boards that are cupped across the grain will be nothing but trouble. Mill rough lumber to 7⁄8 in., taking an even amount off both sides. Sticker the boards so air circulates all around. After a few days, see if the boards are still flat. Joint again if you have to, and take the wood down to the final thickness of 3⁄4 in. Mill the wood for the back, seat and front from one wide board if you can. The cathedral arch figure will then flow nicely from one piece to another, especially if you center the arches down the middle of the board. Set aside some extra wood for setting up dovetailing operations. Make sure all your wood is exactly the same thickness.

PHOTO 1:
FOLLOW A TEMPLATE with a router to shape the back of the stool. The template is the middle layer of a sandwich that allows your router bit to clear the bench top. Shape the stool's front board with the same template.

 

PHOTO 2:
CUT A PERFECT TAPERED SOCKET with this simple jig. The two pieces of plywood are tapered, so the opening between them is wider at one end than the other.

Make the Template
A good template for the back is worth the effort. (Fig. A) You could lay out the pattern directly onto your 3⁄4-in. wood, but smoothing and sanding it will take more time than preparing a thin template. And having a template will allow you to make multiples. Make the template from 1⁄4-in. tempered hardboard, a material that's tough but easy to shape. A router bearing won't dent it. Cut the hardboard with a jigsaw or bandsaw. Smooth the roughly cut curves with a half-round file. Use a block plan...

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