American Woodworker
Contact Us | Help | Report a Bug
Sign in | Join
 

Woodworking Bench Fall River MA

We have the perfect woodworking project for you. Here you will learn how to make your own dream workbench. You must have the right tools to get started. The power tools you will need are tablesaw, planer, belt, orbital sander, router, circular saw, flush-trim bit, and dado blade. If you are missing any of these tools you can find them along with the wood you will need at the hardware supply stores in Fall River, MA listed below.

St. Angelo Hardwoods, Inc. - Genuine Asian Teak Specialist
(401) 624-3900
490 Eagleville Road
Tiverton, RI

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(401)845-5092
878 W Main Road
Middletown, RI
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Woodcraft - Providence, RI
(401) 886-1175
1000 Division Street
East Greenwich, RI

Data Provided by:
Lowe's
(508) 441-5284
55 Faunce Corner Road
N. Dartmouth, MA
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 7 am - 7 pm

Bourassas True Value Hdw.
(508) 995-6366
1837 Acushnet Ave
New Bedford, MA
 
Good Wood
(508) 344-7888
1025 Drift Rd
Westport, MA

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(401)295-1184
1255 Ten Rod Road
North Kingstown, RI
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

North Dartmouth Plz
(508) 979-7200
100 N Dartmouth Mall
N Dartmouth, MA
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10.5-18.5
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10.5-18.5

Handren's Paint & Hardware
(401) 293-5290
3001 East Main Road
Portsmouth, RI
 
Fairhaven True Value Hdw.
(508) 997-3307
23 Popes Island
New Bedford, MA
 
Data Provided by:

Workbench

Dream Workbench

A modern bench that features storage, stability and mobility.

by Dave Munkittrick

Tired of working on a sheet of plywood thrown over a pair of sawhorses? Had it with rolling benches that wiggle and wobble? Hate running around your shop whenever you need a tool? Boy, do we have the bench for you.

Our dream bench starts with traditional workbench features like a thick top, a sturdy base, bench dogs and a pair of vises. Then we added tons of storage, an extra-wide top, and modern, cast-iron vises. Last but not least, we devised a simple method to make the bench mobile and still provide a rock-solid work platform.

Our bench is built to withstand generations of heavy use. Simple, stout construction absorbs vibration and can handle any woodworking procedure from chopping deep pocket mortises to routing an edge on a round tabletop. 

The thick, butcher-block-style top is truly a joy to work on. We’ll show you how to surface this huge top without going insane trying to level 24 separate strips of glued-up hardwood. Our top doesn’t waste wood—even the offcuts are used. 

Tools and Materials

If you go all out like we did you can expect to pay about $900 for materials. If you can’t swing that much dough all at once, don’t worry; you can build an equally functional version for about $450. How? Save $220 right off the bat  by substituting common 2x4s for the maple top. We made several tops this way and they work great. Just be sure you dry your 2x4s to around 8-percent moisture content before you build. You can save $75 by skipping the expensive birch plywood and hardwood. Just stick with construction lumber. The inexpensive bench may not look as classy, but hey, it’s still a great workbench. 

You could build adjustable shelves inside the cabinets instead of drawers and pullout trays. They’re less convenient, but it’ll save you another $110 in drawer slides.

The best thing is you can cut costs and still get a fully functional bench right away, even if you go with the least expensive options. When you’ve got the extra cash, you can always build the maple top or add the full-extension hardware. 

To build the bench you’ll need a tablesaw, planer, belt or orbital sander, a router and a circular saw. You’ll also want a flush-trim bit and a dado blade for your tablesaw. 

Build the Cabinet

Cut the plywood parts for the three individual boxes (Parts D and E) and assemble them (Photo 1). The three boxes are joined to form the cabinet (Photo 2). Screw the two end pieces of birch plywood (H) to the cabinet, placing the screws where the face frame will cover them (Fig. A). Cut the plywood top (C) according to the actual measurements of your assembled cabinet and attach with screws. Do the same for the back (B). 

Cut and assemble the three face frames (parts U through AA). Use the actual measurements of your cabinet to determine ...

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker