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Furniture Jonesboro AR

Sometimes you can separate the parts and then remove the nails. Other times you might be able to drive a nail right through the part and out the other side. The point is you want to make sure wood furniture exudes classic elegance. Taking care of furniture means getting your wood furniture fixed whenever you need it. Not just anyone can repair wood furniture. You need to go to a professional. Here you will find wood furniture repair and restoration in Jonesboro, AR listed below.

The Home Depot
(870)268-0619
711 W Parker
Jonesboro, AR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Bartons Do it center
(870) 932-6675
3023 Browns Lane
Jonesboro, AR
 
LOWE'S OF JONESBORO, ARK.
870 930-9000
2111 FAIR PARK BLVD. JONESBORO, AR, 72401
Jonesboro, AR
 
Fastenal- Jonesboro
870-931-5424
1909 Amanda Ln. Jonesboro, AR, 72401
Jonesboro, AR
 
Indian Mall
(870) 974-7800
1901 S Caraway Rd Ste 1
Jonesboro, AR
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:12-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:12-18

Kmart 7356 / Cross Merch
(870) 972-9020
2010 S Caraway Rd
Jonesboro, AR
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :0-0 and for Sat:0-0
Sun:0-0
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :0-0 and for Sat:0-0
Sun:0-0

Lowe's
(870) 930-9000
2111 Fair Park Blvd
Jonesboro, AR
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

ABC Supply Co.,Inc/Jonesboro
870-931-3550
2501 Commerce Dr Jonesboro, AR, 72401
Jonesboro, AR
 
Hilltop Ace Hardware
(870) 932-1311
4827 East Johnson Ave
Jonesboro, AR
 
SFS Jonesboro
870-935-2232
3105 Prosperity Drive Jonesboro, AR, 72404
Jonesboro, AR
 

Furniture

Fast Furniture Fixes


Major furniture repair often involves disassembling the piece and putting it back together. Sounds simple enough: knock things apart and glue them back together. But anyone who's tried this knows that it never goes that smoothly. This article will show you some slick ways to deal with the most common and frustrating aspects of the job. Plus, we'll show you some shortcuts that might help you avoid disassembly altogether. Just keep in mind that these methods aren't meant for fine antiques. If you suspect that a piece of furniture is especially old or valuable, have an expert take a look (see "Antiques-Repair & Restore" in the Yellow Pages).

1. Twist out damaged screws with an extractor
There are lots of ways to attack screws with damaged or broken-off heads.
But in most cases, drilling into the screw and using a screw extractor is the most foolproof method. Extractors come in sizes small enough to remove 3/32-in.-dia. screws and are available at home centers for $3 to $5. Centering a drill bit on the jagged end of a broken screw can make you curse. So begin by drilling a starter hole with a tiny bit (1/16 in. or so), which is easier to control.



Drill a hole in the screw shank. No need to drill deep-1/8 to 1/4 in. is usually deep enough.


 
Remove the broken screw by inserting the extractor and turning counterclockwise. The extractor will lock into the hole and twist out the screw.

 

Drill holes to get a grip on nails Some nails are easy to deal with. Sometimes you can separate the parts and then remove the nails. Other times you might be able to drive a nail right through the part and out the other side. But in some cases there's no alternative to pulling them. And that means you need a way to grab the nail's head. If you can't get hold of the nail's head, drill holes-just large enough for needle-nose pliers-on opposite sides of the nail shank. Run the bit right along the shank and bore as deep as the shank, if possible. This will help to loosen the nail. 3. Hollow out, then chip out broken tenons
When half of a dowel or tenon stays in its hole, you'll be tempted to grab a bit of the same size and completely drill it out. But this is almost certain to leave you with an enlarged, off-center hole. Instead, use a bit that's about 1/8-in. smaller than the socket. Then break out a section of the remaining material and the rest will chip out easily. A small carver's gouge is the perfect tool for the job, but a narrow chisel or even a sharpened screwdriver will work, too.
4. Disassemble with a hammer
Despite the variety of spreading clamps and prying tools available, hammers are still the favorite disassembly tools of furniture repair pros. Some use rubber mallets, others like dead-blow hammers.

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