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Garden Chairs Cabot AR

Stylish and comfortable, these chairs are also built to last. Made of rot-resistant white oak, with robust joinery secured with weatherproof glue, they’re guaranteed to become some of your garden’s most cherished perennials.

The Home Depot
(501)941-4350
555 Going Road
Cabot, AR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Kmart 3933 / Cross Merch
(501) 843-2206
W Main Street
Cabot, AR
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Lowe's
(501) 241-1500
2301 T. P. White Drive
Jacksonville, AR
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Whit Davis Lumber Plus
(501) 982-2156
723 School Dr
Jacksonville, AR
 
LOWE'S OF N. LITTLE ROCK, AR
501 955-2219
4330 EAST MCCAIN BOULEVARD NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR, 72117
North Little Rock, AR
 
The Home Depot
(501)945-3500
4325 E McCain Blvd
North Little Rock, AR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Whit Davis Lumber Plus
(501) 843-7009
340 Arena Road
Cabot, AR
 
Fastenal- Jacksonville
501-982-2442
617 J.P. Wright Loop Jacksonville, AR, 72076
Jacksonville, AR
 
LOWE'S OF JACKSONVILLE, AR
501 241-1500
2301 T.P. WHITE DRIVE JACKSONVILLE, AR, 72076
Jacksonville, AR
 
Lowe's
(501) 955-2219
4330 East Mccain Boulevard
North Little Rock, AR
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Garden Chairs

Garden Chairs

Enjoy your setting while comfortably sitting.

by Tim Johnson

Stylish and comfortable, these chairs are also built to last. Made of rot-resistant white oak, with robust joinery secured with weatherproof glue, they’re guaranteed to become some of your garden’s most cherished perennials. 

We’ve engineered the building process so you’ll be able to fit every joint using shop-made jigs and simple procedures. There are zillions of mortises, but they’re all routed from only two basic setups that you’ll quickly master. Making these chairs in multiples is really only a matter of physical endurance. White oak is hard and heavy!

Every structural joint consists of two plunge-routed mortises joined by a loose tenon. This variation is just as strong as traditional mortise and tenon construction and it’s much easier to accomplish, particularly on this chair’s angled arm and stretcher joints.

Lumber and Tools

White oak is a bargain compared to other rot-resistant hardwoods like teak and mahogany, and it’s readily available in a variety of thicknesses. We used 8/4 stock for the legs (wide boards so we didn’t have to glue up the blanks), 6/4 for the arms, rails and stretchers and 4/4 for the slats and tenon stock. For dimensional stability, we chose boards with straight grain. Each chair requires about 35 bd. ft. of lumber. We paid $160 per chair for our rough-sawn stock. 

Routing all the mortises will give your plunge router a real workout. It must have a 1/2-in. collet, an edge guide, 2-1/8 in. of plunge capacity and the guts to plunge deep in white oak (at least 1-1/2 hp). 

This project also requires a tablesaw and bandsaw, a drill press with a sanding drum and a router table. You’ll need 3/8-in. and 1/2-in. straight bits for mortising, a 2-in. flush-trim bit, a 1/4-in. round-over bit and a chamfering bit (see Sources, page 87). A jointer and planer are recommended, but not essential. You can have your stock milled to thickness at the lumberyard. 

Building Tips

Squarely-cut blanks are essential for sound joinery and good results. Make sure your tablesaw’s miter gauge makes square crosscuts. The heavy leg blanks may require a crosscut sled or an accurate chop saw.

Use templates to duplicate the shaped legs, arms and seat rails (Fig. D - G, page 84). 1/2-in.-thick MDF is excellent template material (available at most home centers for $5 per 2-ft. x 4-ft. sheet).

Use layout marks to guarantee that mortises and adjoining pieces go where they’re supposed to go.

Plunge-rout the mortises, using a straight bit, an edge guide and clamped-on stop blocks. Mortises are either routed into the end grain using a jig, or into the long grain, using a flush-mounted support block. 

Rout mortises before you cut profiles. It’s much easier to fit the angled joints around the mortises than vice-versa.

Always rout from...

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