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Heavy-Duty Folding Shop Table Salina KS

You can set it up in only a minute and be ready for routing, sanding, planing—you name it. When you’re done, fold up the table into a super-compact unit only five-inches thick and stow it away. Here today, tucked away tomorrow.

LOWE'S OF SALINA, KS
785 452-9303
3035 SOUTH 9TH STREET SALINA, KS, 67401
Salina, KS
 
Fastenal- Salina
785-825-1900
330 E. Schilling Rd Salina, KS, 67401
Salina, KS
 
MIDWAY WHOLESALE - SALINA
(785) 823-7874
1027 York Avenue Salina, KS, 67402
Salina, KS
 
Waters True Value
(785) 823-6400
460 S Ohio St
Salina, KS
 
Lindsborg Hardware
(785) 227-2696
115 North Main
Lindsborg, KS
 
Kmart 7169 / Cross Merch
(785) 825-1591
400 S Broadway
Salina, KS
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Lowe's
(785) 452-9303
3035 South 9Th Street
Salina, KS
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Ace Home Center
(785) 827-4474
321 S Broadway Blvd
Salina, KS
 
175 Central Mall
(785) 826-4300
2259 S 9Th St
Salina, KS
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-21
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-21

John' Door Service
(785) 826-9965
500 N. 5th. st.
SALINA , KS
Services Offered
GARAGE DOOR RESIDENTAL,COOMERCIAL SERVICE
Hours
7 AM - 6PM AFTER HOURS EMERGENCY SERVICE

Heavy-Duty Folding Shop Table

Heavy-Duty Folding Shop Table

by Tom Caspar

Need more bench space? Who doesn’t? Here’s a terrific solution: a folding worktable that’s both big and strong. And we mean strong. 

You can set it up in only a minute and be ready for routing, sanding, planing—you name it. When you’re done, fold up the table into a super-compact unit only five-inches thick and stow it away. Here today, tucked away tomorrow.

Strong = Heavy

This table weighs in at about 70 lbs., a bit more than the full sheet of plywood it’s made from. A lighter table made of smaller plywood parts would be more portable, but not stiff enough to use as a real workbench (Photo 1). For heavy-duty use, extra weight is actually a plus. This table stays put!

Photo 1: This worktable is built for strength. It won’t wobble, sag or walk across the floor. Weighing 70 pounds or so, it’s not going anywhere until you stow it away.

The keys to this table’s strength are its wide rails, rigid continuous hinges and hardwood legs. The oversize rails and long hinges prevent the table from racking. The solid-wood legs prevent the plywood end panels from bending or shaking. 

Go ahead and shove this table around the shop. The hardwood legs can take the punishment. Folded up, it stands on a durable hardwood rail, so you can slide the table across the floor into a small cubbyhole (Photo 2).

Photo 2: This table is built like a rock but knocks down in only a minute. You don’t need any tools and you don’t have to keep track of any loose pieces. Simply unscrew four knobs, fold the rails and legs on top of each other and tuck the worktable away.

Tools and Materials

This is a low-cost, easily built plywood project.Total cost is about $75, half for the wood and half for the hardware. You can build it in a day, no sweat, using little more than a tablesaw, jigsaw, hacksaw and a drill. All you have to do is cut a few plywood pieces to size, rip and cut some narrow 3/4-in.-hardwood boards to length and accurately drive in a whole mess of hinge screws. To make setting the hinges a lot easier, we recommend using a self-centering bit (see Sources). 

Build your table from one sheet of an inexpensive grade of birch plywood (about $40). Fir plywood and MDF are even less expensive, but both are inferior substitutes. Fir plywood is usually quite twisted and MDF is way too heavy. 

You’ll need some 3/4-in. solid wood for mounting the hinges. Plywood won’t do, because the hinge screws run into the edge of these boards. This would place the screws between the plies and chances are they wouldn’t hold. Pine isn’t a great choice, either, because it’s too soft to hold small screws well. Go with a hardwood that’s milled flat so you can glue its faces together. Birch or red oak are good choices.

Pick up most of the hardware at a hardware store or home center (see the Shopping List, ...

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker