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How to Hang Inset Doors Canby OR

Round out your door-installing arsenal with a pair of secret weapons—a plastic laminate sample swiped from the home center and a double-bearing flush-trim router bit. This great new bit should be a fixture in every woodworking shop.

The Home Depot
(503)723-3181
2002 Washington Street
Oregon City, OR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(503)639-3500
14800 SW Sequoia Parkway
Tigard, OR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(503)469-4242
4401 Southwest 110th Ave
Beaverton, OR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Woodcrafters
(800) 777-3709
212 NE 6th Ave
Portland, OR

Data Provided by:
Canby Ace Hardware
(503) 263-2500
1061 SW 1st Ave, Safeway Center on 99E
Canby, OR
 
The Home Depot
(503)925-8447
20260 SW Pacific Hwy
Sherwood, OR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Woodcraft - Portland, OR
(503) 684-1428
12020 SW Main Street
Tigard, OR

Data Provided by:
Rockler Woodworking and Hardware #17
(503) 672-7266
Beaverton Town Square Mall
Beaverton (Portland), OR

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(503)261-8543
10120 SE Washington St
Portland, OR
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Wilco Farm Stores - Canby
(503) 266-2213
195 S Hazel Dell Way
Canby, OR
 
Data Provided by:

How to Hang Inset Doors

How to Hang Inset Doors

Install butt hinges perfectly and establish consistent, slender margins.

by Tim Johnson

Nothing signals skillful craftsmanship like an inset door with elegant hinges and eye-pleasing margins. This challenging job leaves no room for error: Uneven surfaces and unsightly gaps will tell the tale if the hinges, door and frame don’t fit precisely. Like mastering hand-cut dovetails, successfully hanging inset doors on mortised butt hinges is a woodworking milestone. 

I’ll show you a three-step method for installing inset doors that produces great results every time. First, you match the door to the opening. Then you rout mortises for the hinges. And finally, you create uniform, attractive margins between the door and frame. Of course, you can skip the mortising step altogether by choosing different hinges (see “No-Mortise Hinge Options, below”).

To complete the job, you’ll need a couple simple jigs, a mortising bit, and a laminate trimmer. A laminate trimmer is a compact router that’s a really handy addition to any woodworking shop. (If you don’t own a laminate trimmer, this is a great excuse to buy one.) 

Round out your door-installing arsenal with a pair of secret weapons—a plastic laminate sample swiped from the home center and a double-bearing flush-trim router bit. This great new bit should be a fixture in every woodworking shop.

Choose Hinges

Your first task is to choose between extruded (also referred to as drawn or cast) or stamped hinges (see photos, above). Extruded hinges are machined and drilled, so there’s virtually no play between the knuckles or around the hinge pin. Stamped hinges are made from thinner stock. Their leaves are bent to form the knuckles that surround the pin. Extruded hinges will last longer, because their knuckles have more bearing surface.

I often use stamped hinges because they cost about one-third as much as extruded hinges and they’re available at most hardware stores. They work fine in most situations. Examine stamped hinges carefully before buying. If you notice large gaps between the knuckles and vertical play between the two hinge leaves, keep looking. Be aware that some stamped hinges are brass plated rather than solid brass. Hinges with loose pins make it easy to remove and reinstall the door, but they aren’t widely available.

Before you install the hinges, make sure the screws’ heads recess fully in the chamfered holes in the hinge leaves. Amazingly, the brass screws supplied with brass hinges often don’t fit. If that’s the case, you’ll have to deepen the screw-hole chamfers or use smaller screws. 

Brass screws are delicate. The heads strip easily or break off, leaving the shaft buried in the wood. Avoid trouble with broken brass screws by threading the pilot holes with steel screws, which are much more durable. Install the brass screws only once, after the ...

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