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Japanese Dozuki Saws Bedford IN

All Japanese saws cut on the pull stroke; Western saws, as we all know, cut on the push stroke. Once you've made the switch, you'll find the pull stroke quite natural. It has two overwhelming benefits: following a line is much easier, and that makes sawing far less fatiguing, both physically and mentally.

Bedford - Auth Hometown
(812) 279-3501
2943 John Williams Blvd
Bedford, IN
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-19
Sun:12-17
Store Features
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-19
Sun:12-17

Georges Gateway True Value
(812) 275-6532
2201 M St
Bedford, IN
 
LOWE'S OF BEDFORD, IN
812 508-3000
3300 16TH STREET BEDFORD, IN, 47421
Bedford, IN
 
Bender Lumber
(812) 279-9737
3120 Brock Lane
Bedford, IN
 
Holmes Hardware
(812) 849-4200
620 Main Street
Mitchell, IN
 
Kmart 7455 / Cross Merch
(812) 275-3022
1320 James Ave
Bedford, IN
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Lowe's
(812) 508-3000
3300 16Th Street
Bedford, IN
Hours
M-SA 6:30 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Fastenal- Bedford
812-277-0749
514 K Street Bedford, IN, 47421
Bedford, IN
 
Ace Hardware/Ben Franklin
(812) 849-2777
1206 W Main St
Mitchell, IN
 
Rbs Building Materials Dist.
(812) 333-8520
444 S. Paterson
Bloomington, IN
 

Japanese Dozuki Saws

Japanese Dozuki Saws


What's the point of a handsaw in a shop full of power tools? If the saw doesn't cut worth a darn, not much at all. But if it's a Japanese dozuki saw, you'll wonder how you ever got along without one. Dozukis are hand-powered cutting machines. They cost an average of $40 to $50. Handsaws go where machines can't. Sometimes a cut is awkward or time-consuming to set up with a machine, but a good handsaw can do it lickety-split. I used to be a big fan of English-style handsaws, but when I tried a dozuki saw, there was no turning back. Let's first take a look at the differences between Japanese and Western joinery saws and what makes Japanese saws so good. Then we'll look at the general types of dozuki saws, and finally recommend some specific saws to buy.

Japanese and Western Saws
All Japanese saws cut on the pull stroke; Western saws, as we all know, cut on the push stroke. Once you've made the switch, you'll find the pull stroke quite natural. It has two overwhelming benefits: following a line is much easier, and that makes sawing far less fatiguing, both physically and mentally. Japanese saws designed for cutting joints are called dozuki saws. (The word dozuki refers to the shoulder of a tenon.) Dozuki blades are very thin because they're pulled taut as you cut. All dozuki saws have a blade stiffener, or spine, that runs most of the length of the blade and into the handle. The handle itself is always long, narrow and generally wrapped with rattan to improve its grip. It can be held with one hand or with two for additional control. The entire saw is very lightweight. A Western-style saw for cutting joints also has a blade stiffener, or back, and so it's usually referred to as a backsaw. A backsaw's blade must be relatively thick so it doesn't buckle when pushed. The backsaw's handle can be an elaborately shaped grip or a simple turned knob. Both styles are held with one hand. Most backsaws are heavier than dozuki saws. The dozuki saw's thin blade cuts an extremely narrow kerf (Photo 1).

PHOTO 1:
A Japanese dozuki saw is ideal for precision work because it's so easy to control. It cuts on the pull stroke. An English-style backsaw, of course, is just the opposite; it cuts on the push stroke. The dozuki saw blade is very thin and makes a much narrower kerf. The less wood you remove, the easier it is to guide the saw.

 

A backsaw's kerf is often twice as wide, or more. That means you're removing half as much wood with a dozuki and exerting half as much effort. Your muscles can relax, so you can concentrate on following the line (Photo 2). A backsaw requires much more effort and mental anguish, particularly when it's dull. Dozuki saws stay sharp for a very long time. Most saws have tempered teeth so hard they can't be sharpened with a file. When the saw gets dull, you pop in a new blade. Backsaws generally have...

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