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Master Your Brad Nailer Aurora IL

If your firing angle parallels the growth rings, the brad will simply deflect off the hard latewood. Increase the air pressure when you nail into hard wood. Just like a putt that falls off line when it loses speed, a brad driven softly is more likely to deflect.

The Home Depot
(630)907-1480
1250 N Orchard Rd
Aurora, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)554-7092
3080 Route 34
Oswego, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)795-1950
7200 Woodward Ave
Woodridge, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)771-1109
105 N Weber Rd
Bolingbrook, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)462-8607
475 S Schmale Road
Carol Stream, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)637-9200
2920 Audrey Ave
Naperville, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)262-0380
2111 S Randall Rd
Geneva, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Woodcraft - Woodridge
(630) 435-9663
7440 Woodward Avenue
Woodridge, IL

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(630)882-8159
735 Edward Lane
Yorkville, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)792-9600
2000 Butterfield Rd
Downers Grove, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

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Master Your Brad Nailer

Master Your Brad Nailer

Tips and products to make your brad nailer safe and easy to use.

Tim Johnson

Avoid the Blowout Curse

A brad that unexpectedly shoots out the side of your project is guaranteed to make you curse, especially if your finger happens to be in the way. Blowout is instantaneous and dangerous. 

18-gauge brads are so darn thin, they have a tendency to deflect whenever they encounter something hard, like a knot. In most cases, blowout is caused by the wood’s uneven cellular structure, so you can take steps to limit its occurrence. 

• Orient the brad correctly. If you’re attaching a face frame, hold your nailer so its handle is perpendicular to the outside edge (not parallel, as shown in the photo). This positions the brad’s wedge-shaped tip so any side-to-side deflection will be contained in the wood. 

• Fire into the face frame’s growth rings. Check the end grain. 

If your firing angle parallels the growth rings, the brad will simply deflect off the hard latewood. 

• Increase the air pressure when you nail into hard wood. Just like a putt that falls off line when it loses speed, a brad driven softly is more likely to deflect. 

• Protect yourself. Even when you take preventative safety precautions, blowout can still occur. Always wear eye protection and keep your fingers well away from the brad’s path.


Avoid Nailer Elbow

A stiff, unwieldy air hose makes your nailer hard to maneuver, especially in tight spots. This swiveling air plug ($9 for 1/4-in. hose; $10 for 3/8-in. hose) increases your range of movement by acting as a stress-relieving universal joint between your nailer and hose (see Sources, below).


18-Gauge Brads are Interchangeable

Argh! You’re all out of brads. The owner’s manual says “USE OUR BRADS ONLY!,” but the store doesn’t carry the right brand for your nailer. What to do? 

If you’re in this pickle, don’t worry about the brand. The shafts of all 18-gauge brads are essentially the same size. Just make sure the brads you buy are the right length. Most owner’s manuals list the lengths that’ll fit, but here’s how to be sure: On the side of your nailer’s magazine is a series of flutes that correspond to the different brad lengths it accepts. To fit, the brad clip must sit on the steel wear strip at the bottom of the magazine and the brad heads have to rest between the flutes. Brad strips that hang from the flutes without bottoming on the wear strip don’t fit. They’ll cause misfires, jams and/or premature wear. 


Don’t Hammer Your Nailer

High air pressure is hard on your nailer. It’ll wear out the O-rings and other internal components prematurely.

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