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Miter Saws Dover NH

T-track makes the stop easy to install and adjust. When the stop isn't necessary, tightening the knobs draws the bolts into the counterbored holes, so they don't protrude.

Woodcraft - Portsmouth, NH
(603) 433-6116
25 Fox Run Road
Newington, NH

Data Provided by:
Lowe's
(603) 833-4000
160 Washington Street, Suite 800
Rochester, NH
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Fox Run Mall
(603) 431-9600
50 Fox Run Rd Ste 74
Newington, NH
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:9-21
Tue:9-21
Wed:9-21
Thu:9-21
Fri:9-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10-18
Store Features
Mon:9-21
Tue:9-21
Wed:9-21
Thu:9-21
Fri:9-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10-18

Lowe's
(603) 373-2158
1440 Greenland Road
Greenland, NH
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Lowe's
(603) 693-3000
36 Fresh River Road
Epping, NH
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Maine Coast Lumber, Inc.
(800) 899-1664
17 White Birch Lane
York,, ME

Data Provided by:
Warren's Hardware
(603) 664-9300
585 Calef Hwy, Unit 3
Barrington, NH
 
Jacksons True Value Hardware
(207) 439-1133
56 Us Route 1 Bypass
Kittery, ME
 
York Corner True Value
(207) 363-7090
441 Us Rt 1 S
York, ME
 
Heritage True Value Hardware
(603) 942-7741
1382 1st New Hampshire Tpke
Northwood, NH
 
Data Provided by:

Miter Saws

Miter Saws

Whether you're building furniture, cutting trim molding or framing a garage, a compound miter saw is an indispensable tool. It can swivel left or right to make a standard miter and tilt to make a compound cut. Miter saws are capable of both rough and precision work. But no matter what you're doing, hitting your marking line right on the nose has always been a problem. Help is on the way. An accurate laser shows you exactly where the cut will go (Photo 1). A laser just might save you from a careless accident, too. As a fellow woodworker put it, “If the red line is shining on your hand, don't cut!”

PHOTO 1:
The glowing red line of a laser is the latest innovation in miter saws. It's supposed to show you exactly where the blade will cut, but some lasers work better than others. This one is top-notch!

PHOTO 2:
Accurate cuts are no problem at the pre-set angles on any saw. The catch is that you must be picky about aligning the fence to the blade when you first set up the saw.

PHOTO 3:
Tilting and rotating a miter saw allows you to make a right-angle joint with a wide piece of crown molding. Many saws have a detent at 31.6 degrees for making this cut.

PHOTO 4:
Saws with tall fences and stops are best for cutting crown molding in an upright position. This is a more intuitive method than laying the molding flat because the blade isn't tilted. However, with many saws you must rig up a tall wooden fence for it to work.

10-Inch vs. 12-Inch Saws
Most miter saws come with 10-in. or 12-in.-diameter. blades. (Some saws take 8-in. blades, but we didn't test any of those. We also excluded a few saws that can't tilt.) Both sizes share the same general features, but there are major differences: Capacity. Using construction lumber as a rough guide, a 10-in. saw can crosscut and bevel 4x4s and 2x6s. To handle 2x8s and wide crown molding you have to move up to a 12-in. saw. Price. There's a huge difference. 10-in. saws start at about $100; 12-in. at $250. Weight. A 12-in. saw can weigh twice as much as a 10 in. Your back will know the difference if you have to lug the machine around a lot. 10 & 12 in Saws info

PHOTO 5:
Saws that tilt left and right are handy in a crowded shop, where you don't have equal room on either side of the machine. Dual-bevel saws also have better sight lines on both sides of the blade because the motor is out of the way. That's particularly helpful for lefties.

PHOTO 6:
A flat, easy-to-read scale with a thin, hairline cursor gets a big thumbs up. Miter saws kick up
a lot of dust, but
flat scales are easy to wipe clean. We prefer a cursor that's out
in the open, where
no shadows can obscure it.

PHOTO 7:
Hold-downs improve safety and accuracy. An easy-to-use hold-down eliminates the need to put your fingers near the bla...

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