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Miter Saws Windsor CT

T-track makes the stop easy to install and adjust. When the stop isn't necessary, tightening the knobs draws the bolts into the counterbored holes, so they don't protrude.

Moore's Sawmill
(860) 242-3003
171 Mountain Ave
Bloomfield, CT

Data Provided by:
Woodcraft - Manchester/Hartford, CT
(860) 647-0303
249 Spencer Street
Manchester, CT

Data Provided by:
Connecticut Wood Group's Hardwood Outlet
(860) 253-0444
18 Mullen Road
Enfield, CT

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The Home Depot
(413)731-9700
179 Dagget Drive
West Springfield, MA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(860)828-9440
225 Berlin Turnpike
Berlin, CT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(860)286-0300
55 Granby Street
Bloomfield, CT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-7:00pm

The Home Depot
(860)231-1919
503 New Park Ave
West Hartford, CT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 9:00am-6:00pm

Woodcraft - West Springfield
(413) 827-0244
239A Memorial Ave
West Springfield, MA

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(860)496-8620
1580 Litchfield Tpke
New Hartford, CT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(860)582-5329
1149 Farmington Ave
Bristol, CT
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

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Miter Saws

Miter Saws

Whether you're building furniture, cutting trim molding or framing a garage, a compound miter saw is an indispensable tool. It can swivel left or right to make a standard miter and tilt to make a compound cut. Miter saws are capable of both rough and precision work. But no matter what you're doing, hitting your marking line right on the nose has always been a problem. Help is on the way. An accurate laser shows you exactly where the cut will go (Photo 1). A laser just might save you from a careless accident, too. As a fellow woodworker put it, “If the red line is shining on your hand, don't cut!”

PHOTO 1:
The glowing red line of a laser is the latest innovation in miter saws. It's supposed to show you exactly where the blade will cut, but some lasers work better than others. This one is top-notch!

PHOTO 2:
Accurate cuts are no problem at the pre-set angles on any saw. The catch is that you must be picky about aligning the fence to the blade when you first set up the saw.

PHOTO 3:
Tilting and rotating a miter saw allows you to make a right-angle joint with a wide piece of crown molding. Many saws have a detent at 31.6 degrees for making this cut.

PHOTO 4:
Saws with tall fences and stops are best for cutting crown molding in an upright position. This is a more intuitive method than laying the molding flat because the blade isn't tilted. However, with many saws you must rig up a tall wooden fence for it to work.

10-Inch vs. 12-Inch Saws
Most miter saws come with 10-in. or 12-in.-diameter. blades. (Some saws take 8-in. blades, but we didn't test any of those. We also excluded a few saws that can't tilt.) Both sizes share the same general features, but there are major differences: Capacity. Using construction lumber as a rough guide, a 10-in. saw can crosscut and bevel 4x4s and 2x6s. To handle 2x8s and wide crown molding you have to move up to a 12-in. saw. Price. There's a huge difference. 10-in. saws start at about $100; 12-in. at $250. Weight. A 12-in. saw can weigh twice as much as a 10 in. Your back will know the difference if you have to lug the machine around a lot. 10 & 12 in Saws info

PHOTO 5:
Saws that tilt left and right are handy in a crowded shop, where you don't have equal room on either side of the machine. Dual-bevel saws also have better sight lines on both sides of the blade because the motor is out of the way. That's particularly helpful for lefties.

PHOTO 6:
A flat, easy-to-read scale with a thin, hairline cursor gets a big thumbs up. Miter saws kick up
a lot of dust, but
flat scales are easy to wipe clean. We prefer a cursor that's out
in the open, where
no shadows can obscure it.

PHOTO 7:
Hold-downs improve safety and accuracy. An easy-to-use hold-down eliminates the need to put your fingers near the bla...

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