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Precision Squares Bogalusa LA

Many combination squares aren’t very accurate, but this one is made to extremely precise tolerances and is individually checked before it leaves the factory. A good 12-in. square, like this one, should be no more than .002 in. out of square at the end of the blade (for comparison, a piece of paper is about .003 in. thick). Look for a published tolerance this small when you shop for any type of precision square.

The Home Depot
(601)749-2180
2000 Hwy 43 South
Picayune, MS
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Hooker's Ace Hdw
(601) 798-4445
6422 Hwy 11 N
Picayune, MS
 
Quick & Grice Ace Hardware
(601) 798-4851
1007 Highway 11 S
Picayune, MS
 
3300 Highway 11 N
(601) 798-4701
Ste B
Picayune, MS
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9.5-19
Tue:9.5-19
Wed:9.5-19
Thu:9.5-19
Fri:9.5-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17
Store Features
Mon:9.5-19
Tue:9.5-19
Wed:9.5-19
Thu:9.5-19
Fri:9.5-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17

The Home Depot
(225)664-3656
2255 Home Depot Dr
Denham Springs, LA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Bogalusa - Auth Hometown
(985) 732-3641
412 Avenue B
Bogalusa, LA
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17
Store Features
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17

Phillips Do it Best Bldg Suppl
(601) 798-8611
2217 N Hwy 11
Picayune, MS
 
Knights Ace Hardware
(601) 795-4177
1312 S Main St
Poplarville, MS
 
Knight's Ace Hardware
(985) 839-3531
1107 Washington St
Franklinton, LA
 
The Home Depot
(504)464-9200
2625 Veterans Blvd
Kenner, LA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Precision Squares

Precision Squares

How to Use Our Favorite Setup Tools

by Richard Tendick

Every woodworker falls in love with some favorite tools now and then. I count on my faithful set of precision squares every day, from milling the first rough board to installing the last brass hinge. They’re the solid foundation of every successful project. 

When I was a young woodworker, though, my first affair with an attractive square ended in bittersweet disappointment. This tool was a real beauty. It had a rosewood handle inlaid with brass and a blued steel blade. 

As I gained experience, however, I realized my parts weren’t truly square. I blamed everything but the tool itself. One day I compared it to a friend’s square. He was a fussy machinist, so his square was true. Mine was way off! My tool was too inaccurate for critical work but too beautiful to throw away.

My pal clued me in to the best features of a good square, how to test it and how to use it—hard-earned know-ledge I’ll now share with you.

A Classic Precision Square

The most reliable and useful precision square in my shop is a Starrett 12-in. combination square ($64, see Sources, below). Many other finicky woodworkers have told me that they, too, treasure one of these tools. I put my initials on my square and keep it safe in its own special drawer compartment. 

Many combination squares aren’t very accurate, but this one is made to extremely precise tolerances and is individually checked before it leaves the factory. A good 12-in. square, like this one, should be no more than .002 in. out of square at the end of the blade (for comparison, a piece of paper is about .003 in. thick). Look for a published tolerance this small when you shop for any type of precision square. 


Easy-to-read scale

This satin finish is much easier on the eyes than a shiny finish. The ruler has four fractional scales: 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 and 1/64 in. To avoid making mistakes and counting unnecessary lines, use the scale with the same fraction you’re measuring.



6-in. precision combination square

A 6-in. precision combination square is very convenient to carry in an apron pocket. This silicon brass and rosewood jewel is made by Bridge City Tools (see Sources, below).


How Square is Your Square?

No matter how fancy a square looks, when it comes to accuracy, I’ve got to see it to believe it. Inexpensive models, like a 12-in. fixed-blade machinist’s square ($32, see Sources, page 38), should always be tested. Here’s a new variation on an old method of testing any square.

Photo 1: Cut a line down the middle of a piece of tape attached to a melamine board. The bottom edge of the board must be absolutely straight. Check the board’s edge against the top of your tablesaw.

Photo 2: Peel off the right-hand side of the tape.

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker