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Quick-Change Chucks Wasilla AK

We will introduce you to the new style of quick-change chuck. It’s a simple device that fits into any drill and costs less than $15. With one flick of the wrist, you can swap any hex-shank bit or driver in seconds.

The Home Depot
(907)357-8181
1255 Palmer Wasilla Hwy
Wasilla, AK
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Spenard Builders Supply- Wasilla
907-373-2806
2501 E Bogard Road Wasilla, AK, 99654
Wasilla, AK
 
Weld Air Alaska
(907) 373-2000
301 Centaur Wasilla, AK, 99654
Wasilla, AK
 
Spenard Builders Supply- Big Lake
907-892-6001
10927 Big Lake Road Big Lake, AK, 99652
Big Lake, AK
 
Spenard Builders Supply- Eagle River
907-694-3527
17320 Northgate Park Eagle River, AK, 99577
Eagle River, AK
 
Alaska Industrial Hardware- Wasilla
907-376-5274
751 West Parks Hwy Wasilla, AK, 99654
Wasilla, AK
 
Wasilla - B
(907) 352-6800
1000 S Seward Meridian Rd
Wasilla, AK
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:11-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:11-18

Lowe's
(907) 352-3100
2561 East Sun Mountain Avenue
Wasilla, AK
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Alaska Industrial Hardware- Eagle River
907-694-2988
12330 Old Glenn Hwy Eagle River, AK, 99577
Eagle River, AK
 
The Home Depot
(907)276-2006
400 Rodeo Place
Anchorage, AK
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Quick-Change Chucks

Quick-Change Chucks

One click in and one click out. These chucks make bit changing a snap.

by Richard Tendick

Raise your hand if you hate swapping bits and drivers in a cordless drill. I sure do. When I’m putting in screws, I’m always going back and forth, tightening and loosening that darn chuck. Hey, I’ve even gone to the extreme of buying a second drill just to avoid this hassle. There’s got to be a better, and cheaper, answer.

Let me introduce you to the new style of quick-change chuck. It’s a simple device that fits into any drill and costs less than $15. With one flick of the wrist, you can swap any hex-shank bit or driver in seconds. 

I know, you’re going to say you’ve already tried one of these chucks and the bit wobbled all over. I had one of those earlier models, too, and threw it away. But quick-change chucks have changed. To research this story, 

I went out and bought 12 different quick-change chucks—just about every one on the market. Two of the chucks are really terrific. They hold a bit so tightly that it hardly wiggles at all.  

The Chucks

The two chucks I like—MLCS Insty-Lok Quick-Change Chuck and Bosch Clic-Change Chuck—make it really easy to change bits (see Sources, page 43). With these models, you only need to use one hand. Sweet!

I don’t know about you, but I like to keep one hand on my drill’s handle when I’m switching from drilling to driving. My other hand is free to pick up a bit and pop it in. The chuck’s barrel automatically snaps into position, locking the bit in place, and I’m ready to go. 

To remove the bit, I just pull the barrel forward to the unlocked position. It clicks into place, and the bit’s loose. I don’t have to put the drill down, cradle it in my arm, squeeze it between my legs or go through any of the other contortions I had to do with other quick-change chucks that generally required two hands to use.

Bits and Drivers

Any bit or driver with a 1/4-in. hex shank can fit into a quick-change chuck, including twist bits, spade bits, countersink combination bits, self-centering bits, magnetic tip holders and nut drivers. 

Twist bits for quick-change chucks come in two different styles. In the one-piece bit (about $4 each), the shank is hex-shaped rather than round. (One advantage of a hex shank is that the bit isn’t free to rotate in the chuck and develop nasty burrs.) 

A fancier type involves a regular round-shank drill bit fitting into a router-like collet that has a hex shank. If you break or dull a bit, you stick a new one in the collet. Each collet costs about $3, without the bit. Collets are available for many standard diameters but, unfortunately, not in every 1/64-in. increment. 

The collet-type is slightly more expensive than a one-piece bit, but it’s my favorite. I figure it’ll pay for itself do...

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