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Reshaping the Skew Chisel Beckley WV

Begin modifying a conventional skew by reshaping its sides (Photo 1). I prefer to do this on a belt sander mounted in a stand and equipped with a belt designed to cut metal (see Sources, page 44). Be sure to remove all the dust from the sander and set aside its bag to avoid starting a fire. Start with a 60-grit belt; finish with a 120-grit belt.

Kmart 9207 / Cross Merch
(304) 252-8537
301 Beckley Plaza
Beckley, WV
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

LOWE'S OF BECKLEY, WV
304 250-2000
1210 NORTH EISENHOWER DRIVE BECKLEY, WV, 25801
Beckley, WV
 
Crossroads Mall
(304) 254-2000
100 Crossroads Mall
Mount Hope, WV
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Sears Stores
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Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-18

Fayette Awnings & Glass, Inc.
(304) 469-4503
1555 E Main
Oak Hill, WV
 
Hinton Hardware Company
(304) 466-2011
107 Maple Street
Hinton, WV
 
Lowe's
(304) 250-2000
1210 North Eisenhower Drive
Beckley, WV
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 9 am - 8 pm

LOWE'S OF BECKLEY, W. VA.
304 253-6000
1048 N. EISENHOWER DR. BECKLEY, WV, 25801
Beckley, WV
 
Coal City Hardware
(304) 683-6341
1978 Coal City Rd
Coal City, WV
 
Oak Hill - D
(304) 469-6012
9000 Fayetteville Rd
Oak Hill, WV
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Lowe's
(304) 574-5000
46 Fayette Town Center Road
Fayetteville, WV
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 9 am - 7 pm

Reshaping the Skew Chisel

Reshaping the Skew Chisel

An alternate shape minimizes dig-ins.

by Alan Lacer

Years ago, an old professional spindle turner showed me a different way to sharpen a skew. When I tried it, I was sold. This modified grind is more versatile, friendlier and more responsive than a traditional grind. Used correctly, a modified skew is difficult to catch and dig into the wood, unlike a conventional skew. In the years since, I’ve found that many early 20th-century turners from Maine to Indiana adopted the same alternate shape. They were all on to something good.

It’s easy to learn how to sharpen a modified skew. I’ll show you how to take a regular skew chisel with a flat cross section and turn it into a far superior tool in an hour or so.

Shape the Sides

Begin modifying a conventional skew by reshaping its sides (Photo 1). I prefer to do this on a belt sander mounted in a stand and equipped with a belt designed to cut  metal (see Sources, page 44). Be sure to remove all the dust from the sander and set aside its bag to avoid starting a fire. Start with a 60-grit belt; finish with a 120-grit belt. I round the short point side to glide with a smooth motion when planing and to easily rotate and pivot the tool when rolling beads.

Photo 1:  Begin modifying a standard skew on a belt sander. Hold the tool so the belt always travels away from you. Completely round the short point side up to the ferrule; chamfer the sharp edges of the long point side.

Grind the tool’s profile on a 36- or 46-grit wheel (see “The Modified Profile,” above, and Photo 2). I use a coarse wheel because this step removes a lot of material.

Photo 2: Grind the straight and curved profiles. Position the tool rest about 90 degrees to the wheel. I’ve mounted a wood platform on my tool rest to have a broader area of support, which is critical for modifying and resharpening a skew.

Sharpen the Edge

Switch to a 60- or 80-grit wheel. Adjust the tool rest to grind the same angle as on a conventional skew. I prefer to set this angle by measuring distances. The length of the bevel should be approximately 1-1/2 times the tool’s thickness. The angle between both bevels will then be 35 to 40 degrees. As you grind, you’ll probably have to tweak the tool rest’s angle to get it right.

Begin sharpening the straight section (Photo 3). Flip the tool as you go to remove the same amount of material from each side (Photo 4).

Photo 3: Begin grinding the profile’s straight section. Color the old bevel with a felt-tip marker to identify where the wheel cuts.

Photo 4: Flip the tool now and then as you continue grinding. It’s important to keep the bevels on both sides of the tool equally long to center the cutting edge.

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker