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Speaker Stand with Hidden Storage Lake Geneva WI

Don't you love hearing great sound with your movies at home? A pair of these oak stands puts today's small speakers at the ideal height—3 ft. above the floor. We've built cabinets under the speakers that hold a total of 60 DVDs behind secret doors. And we've tucked the speaker wires out of sight—they run inside the stands.

OneHomeCinema
(847) 838-0604
P.O.Box 642
Antioch, IL
Services
Acoustical Design, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Multi-Room Audio, Multi-Room Video
Brands
Crestron, Krell, Vidikron, Stewart Filmscreen, James Loudspeaker, Sonance, Klipsch, Monster Cable, Bass Industries, Fortress Seating, and Middle Atlantic Racks are our main lines. We are involved in automation of blinds, drapes and shades.
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Larry Heuvelman, CGR, CR, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

American TV
(608) 271-1000
2404 West Beltline Highway
Madison, WI
 
Flanner''s Home Entertainment Inc.
(262) 789-1195
16220 W Bluemound Road
Brookfield, WI
Services
Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Multi-Room Audio
Brands
Mitsubishi, Sony, Pioneer Elite, Yamaha, Crestron, Boston Acoustic, Audioquest, Denon, Canton, Sony, Speakercraft, Samsung, LG, Da-Lite, Stewart, Monitor Audio, McIntosh, Def Tech, RTI, Universal Remote, Epson, JVC, Lutron.
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Roger Harteau, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Loren Hellgren, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Silver Screen Home Theater & Audio Systems LLC
(608) 438-2696
754 Bear Claw Way
Madison, WI
Services
Furnishings, Home Theater, Motorized Window Treatments / Home Theater Curtains, Multi-Room Audio, Multi-Room Video
Brands
Denon/Sonance/Panamax/Lutron/Universal Remote Control/Niles/Velodyne/Elan/Panasonic/Atlas Sound/Crown/iPort/Sanus/Salamander Designs/KEF
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Adam Borseth, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Halsten Entertainment
(763) 545-9900
7650 Wayzata Blvd.
Madison, WI
 
Best Buy
8875 N 76Th St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Audio Ventures
(262) 896-9000
S30 W24670 Sunset Dr.
Waukesha, WI
Services
Home Audio, Authorized Service Center

Best Buy
(920) 424-8079
1550 S Koeller St
Neenah, WI
 
Best Buy
3600 County Trunk Hwy A
Kohler, WI
 
AMS
(608) 274-7400
5380 King James WaySte. C
Madison, WI
Services
Acoustical Design, Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Multi-Room Audio
Brands
AMX, Audio Access, Cambridge Audio, Affinity Screens, Definitive Tech, EPSON, Focal JMLabs, JBL Synthesis, Monster, NAD, Oppo Digital, Panasonic, Pioneer ELITE, Sanus, Schneider Optics, Sherbourn, Shunyata, SONY ES, SONOS, Universal Remote.
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Tyler Blackbourn, CEDIA Certified Professional EST III (Advanced EST), CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Speaker Stand with Hidden Storage

Speaker Stand with Hidden Storage



Don't you love hearing great sound with your movies at home? A pair of these oak stands puts today's small speakers at the ideal height—3 ft. above the floor. We've built cabinets under the speakers that hold a total of 60 DVDs behind secret doors. And we've tucked the the speaker wires out of sight—they run inside the stands. 



Start with Straight-Grained Wood
Wood selection makes all the difference in this project. Straight-grained pieces emphasize the stand's simple lines. Wild or angled grain is distracting, but often it's the norm in oak. No problem. If you don't mind wasting some wood, you can make your own great-looking straight-grained boards. Begin by selecting boards for the stiles and rails. You don't need many. It doesn't matter what angle the grain runs at in these pieces, as long as some of it is straight. Save the parts of these boards with really wild grain for the frames (K) and top (P) since their faces don't show. Rip the boards at an angle that follows the grain (Photo 1). Use the new edge to cut your stiles and rails.

PHOTO 1:
Straight-grained wood complements the simple lines of this project. This simple jig with toggle clamps lets you rip straight-grained pieces from ordinary boards.

PHOTO 2:
Cut grooves in the rails and stiles to hold plywood panels and splines. The rails are very short and unsafe to hold by themselves, so push them with a shop-made jig (Fig. B).

Rail, Stiles and Panels
The storage cabinet is basically four frame-and-panel assemblies with similar stiles and rails. They are grooved to hold plywood panels  (G) and splines (E, F). The splines join each assembly. We'll use a standard blade to cut the grooves, rather than a dado blade, because 1/4-in. plywood is usually undersized.
1. Rip and crosscut the stiles (A, B) and rails (C, D). Hang on to your offcuts to use as trial pieces when making the grooves. Note that the stiles are two different widths. The back has two narrow stiles; the door has two wide ones. The sides have a narrow stile in front, a wide stile in back.
2. Cut the plywood panels (G) and use leftover scraps to make splines.
3. To make assembly easier, use sandpaper to slightly round the edges of the panels.
4. Select and mark the best-looking side of each rail and stile as its face. Place the face against the fence each time you cut a groove. That way, any slight variations in wood thickness will create uneven joints on the inside rather than the outside of the speaker stand.
5. Set your blade to 1/4-in. cutting depth and set your fence 1/4 in. from the blade. Cut one kerf in some trial pieces and every stile and rail (Photo 2; Fig. A, Detail 1 ). Move the fence and make a second pass in one of the trial pieces. Use a spline to check the fit of the groove. The spline should slip in easily, allowing room for glue. Adjust the fence if necess...

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