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Table Lamp Biddeford ME

Two precisely angled cuts are key to building the lamp shade. You'll go back and forth between these cuts a number of times. To ensure accuracy, make a setup block with both angles to use every time you reset the miter gauge or the tilt of the blade.

Rockler Woodworking and Hardware #33
(207) 761-4402
200 Gorham Rd
South Portland, ME

Data Provided by:
Elm Street Do it Best Hardware
(207) 284-2228
453 Elm St
Biddeford, ME
 
Port Hardware
(207) 967-2371
153 Port Road
Kennebunk, ME
 
Drillen True Value Hardware
(207) 799-4133
460 Cottage Rd
South Portland, ME
 
Shoppers True Value Hdwe
(207) 799-6191
Mill Creek Shopping Center
South Portland, ME
 
420 Alfred St
(207) 283-2423
Ste 178
Biddeford, ME
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:11-16
Store Features
Mon:9-19
Tue:9-19
Wed:9-19
Thu:9-19
Fri:9-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:11-16

Lowe's
(207) 571-6032
220 Mariner Way
Biddeford, ME
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Lowe's
(207) 883-1309
1000 Gallery Boulevard
Scarborough, ME
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 7 pm

Maine Mall S/C
(207) 828-9314
400 Maine Mall Rd
S Portland, ME
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:9-21
Tue:9-21
Wed:9-21
Thu:9-21
Fri:9-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10-18
Store Features
Mon:9-21
Tue:9-21
Wed:9-21
Thu:9-21
Fri:9-21
Sat:9-21
Sun:10-18

Lowe's
(207) 459-3166
1900 Main Street
Sanford, ME
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

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Table Lamp

Table Lamp

DOWNLOAD PDF PROJECT PLAN

Our table lamp is reminiscent of the Prairie style of design, with lines that Frank Lloyd Wright might favor. In spite of its complex-looking shade, this elegant lamp is within reach of any intermediate woodworker. We've figured out a straightforward system that tames all those nasty angles and guarantees good results. The wiring is also simple, even if you haven't done much electrical work. All the parts are readily available through the mail or at a lighting store. You may find that the hardest part is selecting the stained glass. There is a bewildering array of colors and textures to choose from, but that's part of the fun.

PHOTO 1:
Two precisely angled cuts are key to building the lamp shade. You'll go back and forth between these cuts a number of times. To ensure accuracy, make a setup block with both angles to use every time you reset the miter gauge or the tilt of the blade.



PHOTO 2:

Cut the angled half-lap joints for the lampshade frame with a dado blade. Clamp a stop block to the fence so every joint comes out exactly the same size. Test the fit of scrap parts before cutting the real thing.

Build the Sander Frame
The shade is made of four identical frames. Use a stop block for all the cuts.
1. Mill the 4/4 mahogany to thickness and rip the boards into 1-in. widths. Rough-cut three 12-in. pieces and one 18-in. piece for each of the four frames (K, L, M). Cut enough parts to build an extra frame as a precaution and for setup purposes.
2. Attach a long auxiliary fence to your tablesaw's miter gauge. We added an acrylic guard just as a reminder of where not to put one's fingers.
3. Make a setup block for setting your miter gauge angles by cutting a 38-degree angle on one end and a 26-degree angle on the other one. Use an accurate miter saw to cut the block.
4. Set the miter gauge to cut at 38 degrees (Photo 1). Miter both ends of the frame sides (K) and frame bottoms (M) to final dimensions. Miter just the left edge of the frame top (L). All these cuts can be made using one miter fence setting.



PHOTO 3:

Assemble the frame without glue to determine the exact position of the top's second dado. This piece is actually quite short in the finished shade, but it's much easier to make and hold on the saw if you start with a long piece of wood. Trim the excess length after the frame has been glued up.



PHOTO 4:

Rabbet each frame to accept the stained glass. Make a plywood template with wide edges to guide and support the router. Use double-stick tape to secure the frame to the bench and template. Tuck frame scraps under the template for support. Rout the rabbet with the template guide.

5. Cut the half-lap joint on the mitered end of each piece (Photo 2; Fig. B ). Use scrap wood to set the blade height and a stop block for each cut.

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