American Woodworker
Contact Us | Help | Report a Bug
Sign in | Join
 

Tablesaw Box Joints Aurora IL

Box joints have alternating pins and sockets. To fit together, one piece has pins where the mating piece has sockets (Fig. B, page, 70). The challenge is to cut pins and sockets that are virtually the same size, with paper-thin tolerances for fitting the joint.

The Home Depot
(630)907-1480
1250 N Orchard Rd
Aurora, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)637-9200
2920 Audrey Ave
Naperville, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)795-1950
7200 Woodward Ave
Woodridge, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)771-1109
105 N Weber Rd
Bolingbrook, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)882-8159
735 Edward Lane
Yorkville, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)554-7092
3080 Route 34
Oswego, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)262-0380
2111 S Randall Rd
Geneva, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Woodcraft - Woodridge
(630) 435-9663
7440 Woodward Avenue
Woodridge, IL

Data Provided by:
The Home Depot
(630)462-8607
475 S Schmale Road
Carol Stream, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(630)792-9600
2000 Butterfield Rd
Downers Grove, IL
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Data Provided by:

Tablesaw Box Joints

Tablesaw Box Joints

A shop-made jig with micro-adjust guarantees perfect joints.

by Tim Johnson

Box joints are the savvy woodworker’s alternative to dovetails. Strong, great-looking and quickly made, box joints are an especially good choice when you have a large number of items to produce. To make them, you need your tablesaw, a miter gauge, a dado set and a simple shop-made jig (Fig. A, below). I’ll show you how to build the jig and use its micro-adjust system to dial in perfect-fitting box joints. 

Box joints have alternating pins and sockets. To fit together, one piece has pins where the mating piece has sockets (Fig. B, page, 70). The challenge is to cut pins and sockets that are virtually the same size, with paper-thin tolerances for fitting the joint. Fortunately, the jig can make paper-thin adjustments. It also automatically positions both pieces so their pins and sockets are correctly offset.

Design Details

Pins and sockets can be wide or narrow to suit your project. To size them appropriately, you merely adjust the width of the dado set. For example, to cut 1/4-in.-wide pins and sockets, use a 1/4-in.-wide dado set. The blade’s height determines the length of the pins and sockets. This length matches the thickness of your box pieces. Flat-bottomed dadoes are a must for good-looking joints. 

It’s best to start with your box pieces oversize and trim them to final width after you cut and fit the joints. Box joints usually turn out to be wider than the sum of the pin and socket widths because of the fit-tolerance between each pin and socket. Starting oversize allows you to compensate. 

Photo 1: Set the blade height using a piece from your project. Place the piece on the jig’s carriage and raise the blade. 

A scrap piece held on top tells you when the blade is exactly even with the workpiece. Before moving on to the next step, make sure the miter gauge bar slides smoothly without any side-to-side play. 

Photo 2: Clamp the adjustable fence temporarily to the carriage and cut a slot through both pieces. After cutting, thickness-plane a 12-in.-long piece to exactly fit the slots’ width. Cut this piece into three keys. Trim one key to two-thirds the size of the slot’s height. 

Photo 3: Use three hardwood keys to position the adjustable fence on the carriage. Glue one key in the fence slot. Fit the second key in the carriage slot and sandwich the spacer key in between. Securely clamp the fence to the carriage while butting the three keys snugly together. Drill pilot holes and fasten the fence. Remove the clamps and the two temporary keys. 

Photo 4: Micro-adjust blocks allow you to fine-tune the jig by paper-thin amounts. Attach one block to the carriage base. Butt the second block against the first, with two pieces of paper between them. Fasten this block to the adjustable fence. The space between the carriage bloc...

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker