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Tablesaw Picture Frame Hutchinson KS

Richard’s molding also simplifies assembly. Mitering and gluing odd-shaped picture frame molding can be a struggle. With this technique, the frame is mitered and glued when the stock still has its square profile. That makes building a picture frame much easier.

The Home Depot
(620)728-0460
1907 E 17th Avenue
Hutchinson, KS
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Westlake Ace Hardware
(620) 662-6685
215 S Main St
Hutchinson, KS
 
LOWE'S OF HUTCHINSON, KS
620 513-2000
1930 EAST 17TH AVENUE HUTCHINSON, KS, 67501
Hutchinson, KS
 
Fastenal- Hutchinson
620-663-5600
705 E. 30th Hutchinson, KS, 67502
Hutchinson, KS
 
Mitchell True Value
(800) 642-7392
104 N Kansas St
Haven, KS

Data Provided by:
Lowe's
(620) 513-2000
1930 East 17Th Avenue
Hutchinson, KS
Hours
M-SA 6 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Hutchinson Mall
(620) 669-5700
1500 E 11Th Ave Ste 4000
Hutchinson, KS
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:12-18

Kmart 3184 / Cross Merch
(620) 663-7651
1320 E Thirtieth Ave
Hutchinson, KS
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Mitchell True Value
(620) 465-3451
104 N Kansas St
Haven, KS
 
The Home Depot
(785)749-2074
1910 W 31st Street
Lawrence, KS
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Data Provided by:

Tablesaw Picture Frame

Tablesaw Picture Frame

Safely make shaper-quality molding on your tablesaw without fancy jigs.

by Eric Smith and Richard Tendick

This how-to story has a picture-perfect ending. In fact, you might want to round up some spectators for applause in the final steps. Richard Tendick has developed a safe, simple technique to help you make narrow, complex picture-frame stock using nothing more than a tablesaw. That’s right, there are no routers or specialized jigs and sleds to make, either. With Richard’s system, you actually glue the frame before the final cut. The fun comes when the frame is cut loose from the square stock. 

Richard’s molding also simplifies assembly. Mitering and gluing odd-shaped picture frame molding can be a struggle. With this technique, the frame is mitered and glued when the stock still has its square profile. That makes building a picture frame much easier. 

Grain and Color are Important

This technique requires 1-1/2-in. square stock. For a frame to look good, the grain must flow smoothly around all four pieces (see “Oops,” below) and the color must be consistent. Choose clear, straight-grained wood for your frame stock. It’s best if you can cut the frame stock from a single length of wood. Buy extra wood for test cuts. We found 1-1/2-in. square oak stair balusters sold at home centers to be an excellent source for frame stock. 

Set Up for the Cuts 

1. Rough-cut the frame stock to a few inches over the finished dimensions for cutting on the tablesaw. 

2. Sketch the cuts on the end of each piece for orientation (Photo 1; Fig. A). All cuts start at the same end, so if you find yourself reversing the piece, something is wrong. Pay attention to grain direction! (See Fig. A and “Oops.”)

3. Cut spacer strips 3/8, 5/8 and 3/4 in. wide by 18 in. long. You’ll use these for setting the fence and saw blade height for some of the cuts.

 Making the Saw Cuts

4. Set the blade to make a 3/8-in.-deep cut and make Cut 1 (Fig. A, below). 

5. Set the blade and fence for Cut 2 (Photo 2) and make the cut. 

6. Make Cut 3 with the blade titled to 33 degrees. Set the blade just high enough to poke through the wood about 1/4 in. (Photo 3). 

7. Make Cut 4 to create the rabbet that holds your picture, matte and glass (Photo 4). Set the fence and blade height using Cut 1 as a reference. 

Sanding, Mitering and Gluing

8. Sand the frame before cutting the miters (Photo 5). It’s a lot easier than sanding into the corners of an assembled frame. 

9. Before you cut the miters, take a 1/2-in.-thick slice off your stock. Save the slice for setting up the last cut. 

10. Attach a long subfence to the miter gauge. Use a drafting square to set the gauge at 45 degrees. (see “Tips for Perfect Miters,” AW #108, July 2004). 

11. Cut the miters (Photos 6 and 7).

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker