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Techniques for Tighter, Faster, Stronger Miter Joints Sandusky OH

When you're building a box or frame, the opposite sides must be precisely the same length. Otherwise, even the most perfect miters won't form a tight joint.

The Home Depot
(419)626-6493
715 Crossings Road
Sandusky, OH
Hours
Mon-Thur: 7:00am-9:00pm
Fri-Sat: 7:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

LOWE'S OF SANDUSKY, OH.
419 624-6000
5500 MILAN RD. - SPACE 304 SANDUSKY, OH, 44870
Sandusky, OH
 
Fastenal- Sandusky
419-621-8228
3501 Venice Road Sandusky, OH, 44870
Sandusky, OH
 
Ace Hardware
(419) 433-4797
402 Cleveland Rd E, Dairy Queen in Commerce Plaza
Huron, OH
 
Port Clinton Hardware
(419) 734-9243
1608 E Perry St, Next to McDonalds / Port Clinton
Port Clinton, OH
 
Sandusky Mall
(419) 627-4700
4314 Milan Rd
Sandusky, OH
Store Hours
Sears Stores
Store Type
Sears Stores
Hours
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:11-18
Store Features
Mon:10-21
Tue:10-21
Wed:10-21
Thu:10-21
Fri:10-21
Sat:10-21
Sun:11-18

Lowe's
(419) 624-6000
5500 Milan Road - Space 304
Sandusky, OH
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Gordon Lumber Company
(419) 433-2442
902 Taylor Avenue
Huron, OH
 
Huron Cement Products Co.
(419) 433-4161
617 Main St
Huron, OH
 
Beckleys Plumbing & Htg., Inc.
(419) 483-2870
819 Kilbourne
Bellevue, OH
 

Techniques for Tighter, Faster, Stronger Miter Joints

Techniques for Tighter, Faster, Stronger Miter Joints


Miter joints provide one main advantage over other joints: A miter joint hides end grain and brings face grain neatly together. Everything else about miter joints is a hassle. They're fussy, time-consuming and easy to screw up. But there are ways to minimize those hassles.

The 60-Second Squeeze
When you're dealing with small or hard-to-clamp parts, the best clamping tools might be your hands. Simply apply glue to the parts; then rub them together to distribute and tack-set the glue. Hold the parts together on a flat surface for 30 to 60 seconds (although it may seem like 5 minutes). Watch the joint as you release pressure; if anything moves, squeeze and hold for a few more seconds. Let the assembly sit undisturbed for a half-hour before you handle it again.

Make Micro Adjustments with a Disc Sander
No tool can tweak a miter's fit as easily as a disc sander can. You can shorten the workpiece a hair with a quick touch of the disc. You can also adjust the angle by a fraction of a degree. Instead of fussing with the miter gauge, make tiny adjustments by sticking a paper shim between the gauge and the workpiece. Knock-Off Blocks for Long Miters
Long miters are a nightmare to clamp, but adding temporary triangular blocks makes it a snap. The key is to use paper from a grocery bag. Dab some wood glue on both sides of the paper, stick the blocks wherever you need them and let the glue set overnight. When you're done clamping, remove each block with a hammer blow. The paper creates a weak spot in the glue bond, so the blocks break away without damage to the wood. Use hot water to soften any paper or glue left on the wood, then scrape it away and sand as usual. Customize a Drafting Square
Drafting squares are inexpensive, accurate and great for tool or jig setup. Because they're plastic, you can easily customize them to suit the job. We filed notches in this square to keep the saw teeth from interfering with setup. Drafting squares are available in various sizes for $4 to $10 at art and office supply stores. Guides for Perfect Edging
Mitered guides clamped in place let you perfect the length and angle of mitered edging. Use the edging stock itself to guide the fit of each piece. Clamp the guides precisely in place and work your way around the tabletop, gluing each perfected piece in place as you go. After you glue and clamp a section of banding, remove the adjoining guides immediately so you don't accidentally glue them in place.

The Touch Test
When you're building a box or frame, the opposite sides must be precisely the same length. Otherwise, even the most perfect miters won't form a tight joint. To compare lengths, hold the parts together on a flat surface and feel the ends. Your finger can detect differences your eyes c...

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