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Tool Test: Bandsaws Iowa City IA

If you stop it (which is very easy to do on an underpowered machine), you get a nasty bump. On a 1-hp saw, you must proceed very slowly when resawing and pay a lot of attention to how the motor is performing. Resawing is easier on a 1-1/2-hp saw, for boards up to 6-in. wide. Beyond that, you want 2, 2-1/2 or even 3 hp —the more, the better.

Hill Hardwood Supply, Inc.
(319) 351-6640
3564 Dolphin Drive SE
Iowa City, IA

Data Provided by:
Nagle Lumber
(319) 338-1113
1201 S Gilbert St
Iowa City, IA
 
Iowa City - D
(319) 351-8170
851 Hwy 6 East
Iowa City, IA
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

Iowa City Ace Hardware
(319) 354-4143
1558 Mall Dr
Iowa City, IA
 
Paul's of Iowa City
(319) 338-7217
424 Highway 1 W
Iowa City, IA
 
Amana Society Forestry
(319) 622-7554
1300 220th Trail PO Box 189
Amana, IA

Data Provided by:
Iowa City - Auth Hometown
(319) 337-8646
1676 Sycamore Street
Iowa City, IA
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:9.5-21
Tue:9.5-21
Wed:9.5-21
Thu:9.5-21
Fri:9.5-21
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17
Store Features
Mon:9.5-21
Tue:9.5-21
Wed:9.5-21
Thu:9.5-21
Fri:9.5-21
Sat:9-18
Sun:12-17

Fastenal- Iowa City
319-338-7299
2228 Heinz Road Unit A Iowa City, IA, 52240
Iowa City, IA
 
White Cap- Iowa City
(319) 337-4681
2003 S. Gilbert Street Iowa City, IA, 52240
Iowa City, IA
 
North Iowa City Ace Hardware
(319) 354-4112
600 N Dodge St
Iowa City, IA
 
Data Provided by:

Tool Test: Bandsaws

Tool Test Bandsaws



Same song, second verse. In our last issue,  we tested 19 bandsaws that each cost less than $1,000 (AW #110, October 2004). This time, we're looking at the heavyweights in this class: saws that cost from $1,000 to $1,500. What you get is more power, larger capacity, a super-stiff frame and huge wheels that can easily take wide blades. The difference between this group and the last is comparable to the difference between a contractor's and a cabinet saw. Both will get the job done, but under tough circumstances, the bigger machine gives better results and is a lot more satisfying to operate. It can be a precision tool one day, a small lumber mill the next.

Features 

Power
You simply can't have too much power in a bandsaw. For cutting wood under 2 in. thick, a 1-hp motor is plenty. But one of the really useful things you can do with a bandsaw is to stand a board on edge and split it into two matched halves for panels or tops. You can also save money by sawing thick wood into thinner pieces for drawer sides and jewelry boxes, for example. Either operation is called resawing, and doing it well requires lots of power. A smooth, consistent feed rate is the key to resawing success. If you slow the blade, it wanders. If you stop it (which is very easy to do on an underpowered machine), you get a nasty bump. On a 1-hp saw, you must proceed very slowly when resawing and pay a lot of attention to how the motor is performing. Resawing is easier on a 1-1/2-hp saw, for boards up to 6-in. wide. Beyond that, you want 2, 2-1/2 or even 3 hp —the more, the better. The kerf of a wide blade can be up to 50 percent thicker than the kerf of a narrow blade. Removing that extra wood requires plenty of muscle.



PHOTO 1:

Rock the upper wheel of a large bandsaw. It should barely budge. That's the first of three easy tests that say a lot about a bandsaw's construction. Play in the upper wheel is caused by the sliding mechanism that tensions and tilts the wheel, not by a poor bearing.

 

PHOTO 2:
Push the guide post. It, too, should barely move. After all, the post holds the guides that steady the blade. Excessive play here is usually caused by the rack-and-pinion mechanism that raises and lowers the guides and by flex in the upper wheel housing.

Rigidity
A bandsaw is a hands-on machine, like a lathe. You can feel right through your fingertips how the machine is performing. If it shakes and vibrates, you naturally tense up and have a hard time holding to a fine line. If your bandsaw runs smoothly, it's heaven. In this price range, we expect a saw to be very solidly built. We can overlook some vibration in an inexpensive saw, but who can accept a rough ride in a Mercedes? We carried out three simple tests that tell a lot about how well a saw is built and performs.

Click here to read the rest of the article from American Woodworker