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Veritas Planes West Des Moines IA

Veritas planes have a generous amount of room in front of the rear handle. This is particularly welcome on smooth planes, where space is often cramped. The handle is supported on top to prevent it from breaking, a common problem with old Stanley planes.

The Home Depot
(515)221-2233
3700 University Ave
West Des Moines, IA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(515)287-7269
4900 SE 14th St
Des Moines, IA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

Cappel's Ace Hardware
(515) 225-4323
245 50th St, At the corner of 50th and E.P. True Pkwy
West Des Moines, IA
 
Clive - D
(515) 222-0868
10331 University Ave
Clive, IA
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Mon:8-22
Tue:8-22
Wed:8-22
Thu:8-22
Fri:8-22
Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

WOODSMITH
10320 HICKMAN ROAD CLIVE, IA, 50325
Clive, IA
 
The Home Depot
(515)251-5819
10850 Plum Drive
Urbandale, IA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(515)963-1890
2335 SE Delaware Ave
Ankeny, IA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

True Value Hardware
(515) 279-9905
100 Grand Ave
West Des Moines, IA
 
Lowe's
(515) 267-0300
1700 50Th Street
West Des Moines, IA
Hours
M-SA 6:30 am - 10 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

LOWE'S OF W. DES MOINES, IOWA
515 267-0300
1700 50TH ST. WEST DES MOINES, IA, 50266
West Des Moines, IA
 

Veritas Planes

Veritas Planes

A great value in premium hand tools

by Tom Caspar

“I’m really getting the itch to use good hand tools, so what kind of plane should I buy?” I’ve answered that question for years by urging students in my Unplugged Woodshop class to find a vintage Stanley, tune it up and buy a new high-quality blade. Now I’ve got a better answer: simply pick up the phone or go online and order a new Veritas hand plane from Lee Valley Tools (see Sources, below). 

Feature for feature, Veritas planes are the equal of other premium planes, but they’re significantly less expensive. Considering what you get, and the hours of tune-up labor you’ll save, they’re very reasonably priced.

The latest entry in the Veritas series is a #6 fore plane ($220) for jointing edges and flattening large surfaces. Veritas also makes #4 ($175) and #4-1/2 ($180) smooth planes, and a #5-1/4 jack plane, ($190). All of these planes share the same innovative features, unique to Veritas. A low-angle smooth plane ($160) and a low-angle block plane ($100) are also available.

Features

- Premium Blade 

A great blade can make all the difference in the world, and Veritas blades are among the best. Standard plane blades generally perform well only when freshly sharpened. Premium blades hold a keen edge far longer.

Premium blades are stiffer than standard blades. Veritas blades are made from 1/8-in.-thick A2 steel, a very durable alloy new to plane making. These blades are about 50-percent thicker than standard blades, and that makes them less prone to skip and jump, or “chatter.”

Veritas planes use a screw rather than the standard cam lever to lock down the blade. A screw is a little less convenient than a lever, but it’s not a big deal.

- Rock-Solid Frog

Take a Veritas plane apart and it’s full of surprises. The frog (the part that supports the blade) has extra-large machined surfaces. It actually extends through the sole of the plane in order to support the blade as close to the cutting edge as possible. The frog’s large face and solid bedding further reduce blade chatter.

The blade adjustment mechanism is quite unusual. You swing a knob side to side to level the blade, and turn the same knob to adjust the blade’s depth of cut. One quarter turn of the knob moves the blade up or down by 0.003 in. (the thickness of a piece of paper), about the same as other planes. It’s too bad that the knob is so small in diameter, though. Larger knobs are easier to fine-tune.

Veritas planes have a generous amount of room in front of the rear handle. This is particularly welcome on smooth planes, where space is often cramped. The handle is supported on top to prevent it from breaking, a common problem with old Stanley planes.

- Stable and Tough Body

Flattening the bottom of a plane is hard work. It’s a thankless task that’s got to be done for a plane t...

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