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Wedged Mortise & Tenon Vidalia GA

Experiment with the notch's angle. The wider the taper, the stronger the joint. My taper is 3 degrees, but you can increase it up to 8 degrees. 4. Test the bend. My flexible strips are only 1/8 in. thick opposite the strain-relief hole, so they bend easily.

Lowe's
(912) 277-2000
3209 East First Street
Vidalia, GA
Hours
M-SA 7 am - 9 pm
SU 8 am - 8 pm

Ace Hardware
(912) 557-6785
223 W Brazell St
Reidsville, GA
 
The Home Depot
(770)831-5005
4120 Highway 20
Buford, GA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

C.A.G. Lumber/ Div. ATD
(770) 869-3377
4050 Old Cornelia Hwy
Gainesville, GA

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The Home Depot
(706)781-1865
17 Highway 515
Blairsville, GA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 7:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-7:00pm

Vidalia - Auth Hometown
(912) 538-9040
2707 E First St
Vidalia, GA
Store Hours
Hometown Dealers
Store Type
Hometown Dealers
Hours
Mon:10-19
Tue:10-19
Wed:10-19
Thu:10-19
Fri:10-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:13-18
Store Features
Mon:10-19
Tue:10-19
Wed:10-19
Thu:10-19
Fri:10-19
Sat:9-18
Sun:13-18

Dennard True Value Hardware
(800) 642-7392
119 2Nd St N
Soperton, GA

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The Home Depot
(770)461-9819
103 Pavillion Parkway
Fayetteville, GA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(706)236-9030
103 Hicks Drive
Rome, GA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(770)232-0998
1480 Satellite Blvd
Suwanee, GA
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

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Wedged Mortise & Tenon

Wedged Mortise & Tenon

The joint will never loosen!

by Tom Caspar

Tap, tap, tap. The wedges go home, the glue squeezes out and a big smile lights up your face. “This joint isn’t coming apart for a hundred years,” you say. “It’s as solid as a rock!”

Making a wedged mortise-and-tenon joint is richly rewarding. Once you understand how it works (see photo, below), you can’t help but admire the joint’s elegant simplicity. It also sends a message. A wedged joint says to one and all, “This was made by a skilled woodworker.” 

How the Joint Works

Here’s a cutaway view of a wedged mortise-and-tenon joint. Driving in the wedges forces the tenon to flare into a fan or dovetail shape. The mortise is tapered to match the angle of each wedge. Like a dovetail, this joint can’t pull apart after the wedges go home.

This tenon has two unusual features: saw kerfs that create flexible strips and holes that disperse the strain that the wedges create. The wedges cause the strips to bend; the holes prevent the bend from splitting the rail.

Where could you use a wedged joint? It’s a candidate for any joint that receives a lot of stress. A table base is a good example (top photo). Pushing or leaning on this table might slowly force a standard joint apart, but wedges keep this joint locked together. 

The wedged mortise-and-tenon joint isn’t difficult to make, but you should have some experience making standard mortise-and-tenon joints before tackling it.

Tools Required

To make this joint, you’ll need a tablesaw, drill press, plunge router, chisel and a bandsaw. If your mortise’s width is 5/8 in. or more, like the mortise I made, you’ll need a 1/2-in.-dia. top-bearing flush-trim bit ($19). If the mortise is more than 3/4 in. deep, you’ll need a bottom-bearing flush-trim bit ($20) (see Source, below). For a mortise less than 5/8 in. wide, you’ll need a straight router bit and a fence or jig for your plunge router.

Rout the Mortise

Before you begin your project, make a prototype joint (see photo, below). 

Designing Your Wedged Joint

Each part of a wedged joint must often be tailored to fit the joint’s size, intended strength and type of wood. Make a prototype following these steps: 

1. Substitute a notch made with a dado set for the mortise (see “How the Joint Works,” page 45). Taper both of the notch’s sides by angling the miter gauge.

2. Make a full-size tenon. Observe how well the flexible strips bend. You may be able to use smaller strain-relief holes or no holes at all.

3. Experiment with the notch’s angle. The wider the taper, the stronger the joint. My taper is 3 degrees, but you can increase it up to 8 degrees. 

4. Test the bend. My flexible strips are only 1/8 in. thick opposite the strain-relief hole, so they bend easily.

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